Book Reviews: Stamped and The Lost Tribes

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You  by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi

Based on (a Remix of) Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi

I expected this book to be well-written, thought-provoking, and engaging. And it truly was, starting with the Introduction by Ibram X. Kendi (how often are Introductions themselves absorbing?) It was also painstakingly researched by Dr. Kendi, (a professor of history and international relations), as revealed in the twenty pages of source notes.

What I didn’t expect was that it would be so hard to put down. But that’s how Jason Reynolds made his remix of Kendi’s book. Once I started reading, I didn’t want to stop. Even though I am decades away from Jason Reynolds’ target audience, I had to keep turning the pages.

The book traces the history of racism over six hundred years, from its roots and through its introduction to newly-colonized America, up to the present day. But it is not, as Reynolds emphasizes, a history book. It is a book that contains history – a history that is most often troubled and troubling.

It was hard to read about some people I admired from the past. Jason Reynolds paints nuanced portraits that shows how complex these people were, and how they changed and evolved over time. It was harder still to read about people from my lifetime – some of whom I voted for. This book is eye-opening and revealing, including about some of my own unconscious assumptions. Because, as Jason says, this book is about all of us.

This is a vital, riveting book. I read it months ago and have wanted to review it ever since, but, well, it’s been a fraught year. Also, I was daunted by the knowledge that I can’t begin to do the book justice. Read it and let it speak for itself. I highly recommend it. If you don’t think a Young Adult book is for you, consider Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi. It may be the next book I read on this subject.

These two authors held a very interesting discussion about their book with some high school students you can read about and listen to.

As  Christine Taylor-Butler wrote in June of last year, “I’m a parent, author, and a former college interviewer. Please hear me – in this time of stress people want to “flood” their kids with books about racism. Please provide 20 joyful books for every one book on racism. They also need to know POC kids are like every other kid.”

I began to take her advice for myself, and read her book The Lost Tribes. It fulfills her suggestion perfectly! Five friends from diverse backgrounds have adventures while just being kids. And what adventures! They’re given a high-tech computer puzzle to solve, with virtual reality that takes them to Egypt, Easter Island, Peru, and sub-Saharan Africa among other far-off places. The computer simulations become eerily realistic. And when their parents disappear, they have to undertake a dangerous journey. The kids discover that nothing is what they thought. The truth is amazing and empowering.

I can’t really capture the story, especially without giving too much away. Science and history are woven throughout in fun and interesting ways. There are puzzles and codes the kids have to solve, and readers can try out, too. And the website has a couple of fun challenges with more to come (delayed by the pandemic). But you can watch the cool trailer, meet the kids, and get introduced to their parents.

Kirkus Reviews calls it “Well-written and well-paced: a promising start to what should be an exciting and unusual sci-fi series.” See the full review here.

I recommend this book if you’re looking for a good story for kids who like adventure – or if you’re such a kid at heart yourself.

The next book, Safe Harbor, is out, and a third is expected later this year. I’m looking forward to continuing the adventure!

Happy Juneteenth!

Book Review: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

A powerful, gripping, timely story.

When I saw Angie Thomas’ The Hate U Give in my local bookstore, I admit the title made me wary. But when my husband brought it home to read for himself, I glanced inside, and read. And read. And read. I could hardly put it down, and finished it in record time.

I’m pretty new to reviewing books, but the turmoil of our recent times moves me to try to do my best by this remarkable novel. I’m working from memory of when I read this perhaps a year ago. The details may be fuzzy, but the story has stuck with me.

16-year-old Starr is dragged to a party that she doesn’t want to go to. The one good thing is she reconnects with her childhood best friend, Khalil. When Khalil is driving Starr home, they’re pulled over by a policeman for no visible reason – and Khalil, unarmed, is shot and killed.

Starr is grief-stricken, her life and world turned upside down. Her friendships are stretched to breaking. Over time, everyone she cares most about is in danger. And Starr is faced with the dangerous decision of to speak out, or not.

Starr’s story is told with power, with surprising humor, and with love. The people in it are all so very real, flesh and blood human beings. I felt like I got to know Starr and her family, and that was a privilege. I cared deeply about them, and got swept up in what was happening to them, the harrowing choices they had to make.

My husband reads more nonfiction than fiction, but he, too, could barely put this book down. We saw the movie together. It differs from the book in a few significant ways, but author Angie Thomas was an executive producer, and that gives me some assurance that the changes had her permission. The ending may even be more powerful than the book’s.

Both the book and the movie have my highest recommendation. They are excellent in their own rights, and so very important, especially now. I really haven’t begun to do them justice; to do that, read and see them for yourselves.

Black lives matter. Black voices need to be heard. Black stories need to be told.

Publisher’s Weekly has made lists of antiracist fiction and nonfiction reading for adults. You can find the fiction list here, and the nonfiction list here.

For antiracist nonfiction for younger people, have a look at Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi. I have not yet read it, but an interview with the authors – and some high school students who read their book – make a very compelling case for it.

But as black author Shanna Miles said on twitter, “By all means pick up books about how to talk about racism but then you must pick up books about black kids being kids. If you don’t you teach your children that the natural state of being for black folks is suffering.” She links to some books on that twitter comment, and has made a Goodreads list as well.

Her feelings on this matter are echoed by Christine Taylor-Butler, a black kid lit author who said on twitter, “I’m a parent, author, and a former college interviewer. Please hear me – in this time of stress people want to ‘flood’ their kids with books about racism. Please provide 20 joyful books for every one book on racism. They also need to know POC kids are like every other kid.” She has written a blog about why diversity matters in science fiction and fantasy.

These authors opened my eyes to a new perspective. I’ve added their books to my reading list. I welcome more recommendations on these subjects in the comments.

 

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑